Chris's Weblog – City Chickens

Monthly Archive: June 2017

Scaevola Topaz Pink – Aemula


Laura went out yesterday and came back with a pot of Scaevola Topaz Pink, I had never come across this flower before and on reading a bit about it thought it would be a good candidate for the pond. This unusual and beautiful plant is  perfect for baskets and containers. The flowers are fascinating with all the petals clustered on the lower half of the flower in a fan-shape. Its common name is Fairy Fan Flower. It has a naturally trailing habit and prolific flowering and gives a continuous show of colour throughout summer. This variety, Topaz Pink, has pastel pink flowers. I cant see any sign of seed heads so I assume that this plant should be propagated from cuttings. I intend to try this in September.

Scaevola is a sun-loving annual that grows 8 to 12 inches tall and produces a non stop show of pink flowers. Because scaevola is an Australian native the plants are heat tolerant and have almost no insect or disease problems. Scaevola is also self cleaning so you don’t have to remove the dead flowers to keep the plant in production. The plants attract butterflies and are generally safe from slugs and aphids. In very warm parts of the country it can be treated as a tender perennial.

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Corydalis

This little beauty has popped up here and there all around the garden and I had no idea where it had come from. Its a very pretty ferny foliage and is now showing some lovely yellow flowers. I have googled it and find that it is called Corydalis and is a genus of about 470 species of annual and perennial herbaceous plants in the Papaveraceae family, native to the temperate Northern Hemisphere and the high mountains of tropical eastern Africa. They are most diverse in China and the Himalayas, with at least 357 species in China. Wherever it has come from I like it. I had dismissed this plant as more of a pretty weed, the seeds of which had arrived either in wood chip or horse manure but on searching I find that it is a valued garden plant and indeed starred in a recent Gardeners World episode being planted by Monty Don. All the plants that have appeared in my garden are the yellow variety but I find that it also comes in white, pink and blue.

Aubrieta Royal Blue and Red

Earlier in the year I bought some seeds of Aubrieta from Seekay and the instructions say to sow from June to July. They are very tiny and I don’t want to lose them to insects but I am planning to sow a few directly into the side garden in the hope that they will grow into some strong plants to use around the pond.

Aubrieta is a genus of about 12 species of flowering plants in the cabbage family Brassicaceae. There are six European species and take their name from Claude Aubriet (1688-1743), a French botanical artist. All are found on limestone but some appear on open scree, others in crevices while some crop up in coniferous woodland.  The genus originates from southern Europe east to central Asia but is now  common throughout Europe. It is a low spreading plant, hardy, evergreen and perennial, with small violet, pink or white flowers that grow well amongst rocks and banks. It prefers light, well-drained soil, is tolerant of a wide pH range, and can grow in partial shade or full sun. The technique to keep Aubrieta going year after year is to shear them hard as they finish their display so that they develop a new cushion of tight foliage. Cuttings can be taken, and ideally these need to have three inches of brown stem below the rosette of foliage. The technique is to tug them away with a heel rather than cut them. This can be done in September and October when the cushion of foliage is dense, or in late summer. A cold frame is ideal as it keeps the root cool. Sow seeds in spring.

Arabis Spring Charm – Rock Cress

Arabis is an attractive evergreen perennial which forms a low-growing mat of jagged, hairy grey-green leaves. It produces masses of stunning, sweetly-scented, pure white flowers in March and May. Ideal for using as an edging plant or growing around the base of shrubs, it requires good drainage and will thrive in sun or shade. It can be used to clothe a bank and looks excellent when set off against a backdrop of large rocks making it a great choice for the rock garden. Best cut back after flowering. I scattered a few seeds in the side garden in May and they have already formed nice little plants so I have sown a few more today.