Chris's Weblog – City Chickens

Tag Archive: Clematis

Clematis Cirrhosa Freckles Purpurascens – Winter Flowering

Clematis Cirrhosa Freckles is an evergreen variety that flowers from November to February. Freckles can reach a height of 12′ . This variety introduces a bit of colour and scent into a Winter garden. It is happy in a large container with support and some protection from strong winds. It is a group one Clematis so needs no pruning just keeping tidy. It carries attractive silky seed heads and green foliage with a bronze tint.

Scented, bell-like, cream winter flowers heavily speckled inside with reddish-brown freckles and glossy, dark-green leaves. This evergreen clematis is ideal for training over a sunny pergola or arch. This is the best way to appreciate the distinctive freckle-like markings, which are less visible when the plant is grown against a wall.  No routine pruning is necessary. If the spread of the plant needs to be restricted prune immediately after flowering, cutting back overlong shoots to healthy buds. Apply a slow-release balanced fertiliser and a mulch of well-rotted garden compost around the base of the plant in early spring.

 

 

Clematis Miss Bateman Group 2

I bought this Clematis yesterday from Lidl for £3.99. It looks very good with lots of new growth and large root. I have bought a Clematis from Lidl before, the Hagley Hybrid and it has been flowering for years so I am looking forward to adding it to the garden. I bought it to replace Miss Christine which I loved but which died on me after once being replaced by Crocus.com the replacement died also. That one was £17.99. I would like to place it in the same spot but think that may be too risky so I am opening up a new border behind the trellis and I shall place it there.

This variety has white early summer flowers initially striped green with contrasting chocolate centres. This compact  large flowered clematis is excellent for growing in a large container or through a shrub or tree. Coping well in full sun or partial shade, it produces a second flush of satiny flowers from August to September.

 

Group 2 Clematis, sometimes known as Group B, include all the early, large flowered hybrids which will produce their first flush in May or very early June. Prune in February or early March. By then their buds will be swelling and green and easy to see. If the winter has been very cold growth will be delayed in which case you can prune in early to mid March instead as it is easier to see what you are doing. The exercise really involves a tidy up of the plan. Start at the top of each growth and work down. Once you reach the first pair of good, strong buds prune just above that.

Clematis from Seed

imageI love growing plants from seed. The pure joy of seeing a healthy green seedling pushing through after you have sown a tiny black dead looking seed is well worth the effort. It is time consuming and fiddly but I’m not very good at sewing, knitting or crochet like most ladies but I do seem to have some success with plants. I have been having a go with vegetable and flower seeds over the years but one plant that I have never grown from seed is Clematis. This Autumn I put in a few cuttings and am looking forward to seeing the results of those but I am determined to try and raise some from seed next spring.

I have read a little but prefer to learn by trial and error. The few tips I have gathered are as follows. Clematis seeds throw down deep roots so need to be sown in gritty, sandy compost in a deep container or pot. Germination can take from six weeks to three years. Ah well we will see. Heat isn’t needed and sown seed can be left in a cold greenhouse or outside. Moisture should be maintained by covering the pot with grit and enclosing in a polythene bag. I dread to think how many seed heads I have thrown into the compost over the years, however this last year I did save a few and put them into seed modules In sandy compost. I don’t hold out much hope for those but next year I will be more prepared.

Growing Clematis from Cuttings

imageI have been taking stock of the Clematis in the garden and reading up about how to prune or propagate them. Softwood cuttings are best taken between April and June from the mid-sections of strongly growing vines. The tips will be too soft and the lower parts may be too woody.  Prepare the selected section of vine by cutting through it immediately above a leaf joint and again about 3-4 cm below the same node. Remove the excess foliage to reduce moisture loss. Insert the cutting into compost up to the leaf joint. Label the pot and water it gently. Cover the surface of the compost with grit to deter slugs and retain moisture. Place in a well-lit area out of direct sunlight and maintain a humid atmosphere by covering with polythene or a propagator. Bottom heat will aid rooting but is not essential. Rooting should occur in four weeks. Pot up separately when rooted but if they are not ready by late summer delay the job until next spring and grow the cuttings on for another year before planting out.

 

Spring Clematis – Vyvian Pennell and Montana Rubens

I have added two more Clematis to the side garden. Clematis Vyvian Pennell – This vigorous climber has double frilly flowers of violet blue blooming in May , June and September. Clematis Montana Rubens – Sun loving drought tolerant plant. Ideal for fast growing screening.  Will tolerate full sun and sandy, drought-prone soils as well as cold exposed locations and heavy clay soils.

 

Lilac Time

 

This is the view I have when I am hanging out my washing and looking up into the Lilac tree which always blooms at the same time as the pink Clematis. The Lilac doesn’t have a scent but the Clematis does and early morning and evening it is worth going out there and doing a few deep breaths.

Clematis Miss Christine

The weather is warmer now and everything is growing well. The Clematis Miss Christine, bought from crocus.com last year, is a picture and smells lovely. ‘Miss Christine’ is named after the youngest daughter of clematis breeder Sheila Chapman. It’s a vigorous grower , typical of the species, producing masses of single white blooms with a pale pink edge on the reverse of its tepals. The flowers also have a rich, sweet scent that will fill the garden on a warm day. It’s an adaptable plant that is happy in most soils. This is an early-flowering clematis that should only be pruned once the blooms have faded.

Update:  I bought this Clematis from Crocus.com and unfortunately it died, was replaced but died again. I will buy again though as it was a beautiful variety.

http://www.taylorsclematis.co.uk/clematis-miss-christine.html

Clematis From Lidl – Hagley Hybrid and Rouge Cardinal

Clematis Rouge CardinalI treated myself to two Clematis today from Lidl. Only £4.99 each and both beautiful sturdy plants with loads of flower buds. One is called Clematis Hagley Hybrid and was raised  in 1945 by the head gardener at Hagley Hall. It is also known as Pink Chiffon. I have planted this one on the trellis at the opposite end to Miss Christine. The other is called Clematis Rouge Cardinal and I have planted that one in the side garden. Clematis Rouge Cardinal raised by Giraultin from Orleans in France in 1968. A stunning flower colour of velvety crimson, with a satin sheen to the sepal surface, fading as the flower ages. A full rounded 4″ wide flower. Brownish red anthers. Very free flowering habit. It flowers mid summer to early Autumn.

Jasminum Officinale & Clematis Warsaw Nike

 

jasmine

Today I treated myself to two climbers from Sainsbury’s. A Jasmine and a Clematis. Jasmine is one of the first plants that comes to mind when thinking of fragrance for the garden. Both have been planted in the garden behind the picket fence to protect them from ducks, chickens and bunnies. They should look good against the new fence.  A single jasmine vine can perfume an entire room or garden. It is a sprawling, twining deciduous shrub, usually pruned heavily to keep its size contained. The foliage is slightly downy with pinnate leaves. The flowers are white and fragrant, flowering  from early summer to autumn.

 

clematis

The Clematis is a large flowering variety called Warsaw Nike. A late, large-flowering clematis that produces rich, velvety-purple flowers freely in midsummer and usually a second flush will appear in September. An easy-to-grow climber that’s great for a sunny wall.

Garden Birds Brighten up A Grey Day

It’s grey, foggy and cold outside this morning so, after making sure that all the pets are fed and comfortable, to cheer myself up I have ordered the seed potatoes for next year. I am using Alan Romans again as we have always received reliable quality goods from them. I have ordered one bag of Charlotte, three bags of International Kidney and three bags of Vivaldi. We have grown them all before so no surprises. They are first and second earlies so they should be up before any risk of Blight. Despite the greyness of the day there was plenty of colour and entertainment in the garden this morning as the birds were busy feeding.