Chris's Weblog – City Chickens

Tag Archive: climber

Clematis Cirrhosa Freckles Purpurascens – Winter Flowering

Clematis Cirrhosa Freckles is an evergreen variety that flowers from November to February. Freckles can reach a height of 12′ . This variety introduces a bit of colour and scent into a Winter garden. It is happy in a large container with support and some protection from strong winds. It is a group one Clematis so needs no pruning just keeping tidy. It carries attractive silky seed heads and green foliage with a bronze tint.

Scented, bell-like, cream winter flowers heavily speckled inside with reddish-brown freckles and glossy, dark-green leaves. This evergreen clematis is ideal for training over a sunny pergola or arch. This is the best way to appreciate the distinctive freckle-like markings, which are less visible when the plant is grown against a wall.  No routine pruning is necessary. If the spread of the plant needs to be restricted prune immediately after flowering, cutting back overlong shoots to healthy buds. Apply a slow-release balanced fertiliser and a mulch of well-rotted garden compost around the base of the plant in early spring.

 

 

Japanese Wisteria Sinensis Alba

I went to buy a birthday present for Janice and couldn’t resist buying one for home too. I bought a Japanese Wisteria from Webbs of Wollaston. They were £9.99 each and look really healthy. Now, one month on, it’s still in its original pot and I am nervous about potting it on. I don’t want to lose it. Wisteria is a vigorous climber with long, fragrant, pendulous pea shaped flowers and lime green foliage. This white variety of Japanese Wisteria can grow to 12 metres high and up to 8 metres wide and needs a wall or an arch or pergola. This climber can also be trained to grow up into a mature tree. I have read that the stems get large and gnarled and woody as the wisteria matures.  The fragrant flowers appear in spring and early summer and will occasionally give a second flush in late summer.

I don’t really have a perfect spot for this plant so I think I may put it into a large 50 litre pot with a strong support for a couple of years. Update – The Wisteria is now in a large planter with an obelisk for support. Fingers crossed.

 

 

Lathyrus Latifolius Red Pearl – Everlasting Sweet Pea

An everlasting Sweet peas, Red Pearl, is a reliable, easy to grow perennial plant. It will scramble up trellis or through a shrub and give cut flowers all summer. Cut back in autumn and they will shoot up again in the spring. Being leguminous they provide nitrogen to the soil.  Best in a well drained position against a trellis or wall in sun or part shade. Hardy perennial. I have soaked ten of these seeds overnight and they are now in a module tray.

Lathyrus latifolius, the perennial pea vine, perennial pea, broad-leaved everlasting-pea, or just everlasting pea, is a robust, sprawling perennial in the Pea Family Fabaceae. It is native to Europe but is present on other continents, such as North America and Australia, where it is most often seen along roadsides.

Lathyrus latifolius keeps its roots in a tidy clump, is easy to raise from seed, and is wonderfully fresh at a difficult time of year. Plant it next to something that dies down after midsummer or put it under a shrub and let it climb through the branches. It is best to sow indoors and put out when you get a strong plant.

Clematis Miss Bateman Group 2

I bought this Clematis yesterday from Lidl for £3.99. It looks very good with lots of new growth and large root. I have bought a Clematis from Lidl before, the Hagley Hybrid and it has been flowering for years so I am looking forward to adding it to the garden. I bought it to replace Miss Christine which I loved but which died on me after once being replaced by Crocus.com the replacement died also. That one was £17.99. I would like to place it in the same spot but think that may be too risky so I am opening up a new border behind the trellis and I shall place it there.

This variety has white early summer flowers initially striped green with contrasting chocolate centres. This compact  large flowered clematis is excellent for growing in a large container or through a shrub or tree. Coping well in full sun or partial shade, it produces a second flush of satiny flowers from August to September.

 

Group 2 Clematis, sometimes known as Group B, include all the early, large flowered hybrids which will produce their first flush in May or very early June. Prune in February or early March. By then their buds will be swelling and green and easy to see. If the winter has been very cold growth will be delayed in which case you can prune in early to mid March instead as it is easier to see what you are doing. The exercise really involves a tidy up of the plan. Start at the top of each growth and work down. Once you reach the first pair of good, strong buds prune just above that.

Polygonum Baldschuanicum – Russian Vine

Yesterday Sean an Deb brought along a mile-a-minute vine that they had picked up for a pound. It had been reduced from £6.99 but there are a few green shoots showing so maybe it will turn out to be a bargain. I have planted it in the side garden where the two big trees used to be but shall keep a close eye on it  as it can be as naughty as Ivy in it’s destructive habits. I plan to cut it back severely each Spring. Update – Well it definitely turned out to be a bargain. It has grown into a beautiful healthy plant and at present, November, it is covered in delicate white flowers and has draped itself along the side fence for every passer by to enjoy. My big plan is to take some cuttings and start some new plants next year. I didn’t realise before what an attractive plant it is.

Russian Vine is grown for its flower-laced vines and as it is a fast growing plant it is grown as cover for unsightly fences and other garden structures. However, it has the capacity to become invasive by spreading beyond its intended limits. The white flowers are decorative and provide nectar and pollen for bees. wiki

 

 

 

 

 

 

Growing Clematis from Cuttings

imageI have been taking stock of the Clematis in the garden and reading up about how to prune or propagate them. Softwood cuttings are best taken between April and June from the mid-sections of strongly growing vines. The tips will be too soft and the lower parts may be too woody.  Prepare the selected section of vine by cutting through it immediately above a leaf joint and again about 3-4 cm below the same node. Remove the excess foliage to reduce moisture loss. Insert the cutting into compost up to the leaf joint. Label the pot and water it gently. Cover the surface of the compost with grit to deter slugs and retain moisture. Place in a well-lit area out of direct sunlight and maintain a humid atmosphere by covering with polythene or a propagator. Bottom heat will aid rooting but is not essential. Rooting should occur in four weeks. Pot up separately when rooted but if they are not ready by late summer delay the job until next spring and grow the cuttings on for another year before planting out.

 

Rosa Paul’s Scarlet

Another bargain Rose from Aldi. This brilliant red climber will be in a pot against a  trellis between the side fence and the small shed. It looks really healthy so far so I am hoping for good results come June next year.

Paul’s Scarlet is a very free flowering old climbing rose, producing large clusters of brilliant, unfading scarlet double flowers, with dark green leaves. A friendly climber as the near- thorn less stems are easily trained. (Information from Ashridge Nurseries)

Spring Clematis – Vyvian Pennell and Montana Rubens

I have added two more Clematis to the side garden. Clematis Vyvian Pennell – This vigorous climber has double frilly flowers of violet blue blooming in May , June and September. Clematis Montana Rubens – Sun loving drought tolerant plant. Ideal for fast growing screening.  Will tolerate full sun and sandy, drought-prone soils as well as cold exposed locations and heavy clay soils.

 

Clematis Miss Christine

The weather is warmer now and everything is growing well. The Clematis Miss Christine, bought from crocus.com last year, is a picture and smells lovely. ‘Miss Christine’ is named after the youngest daughter of clematis breeder Sheila Chapman. It’s a vigorous grower , typical of the species, producing masses of single white blooms with a pale pink edge on the reverse of its tepals. The flowers also have a rich, sweet scent that will fill the garden on a warm day. It’s an adaptable plant that is happy in most soils. This is an early-flowering clematis that should only be pruned once the blooms have faded.

Update:  I bought this Clematis from Crocus.com and unfortunately it died, was replaced but died again. I will buy again though as it was a beautiful variety.

http://www.taylorsclematis.co.uk/clematis-miss-christine.html

Jasmine Revolutum

 

I have bought another climber for the side garden. It is a Jasmine called Revolutum and has bright yellow flowers. I shall keep it in the pot for a little while before I plant it out. When in the garden it will be protected by a rigid netting cover to keep off the worst of the wind. This should complete the planting in the side garden. Originating in the dry valleys of the Himalayas Jasmine Revolutum will remain evergreen in sheltered positions. Plants are bushy and make very beautiful free-standing shrubs, but if grown against a wall the stems will climb and may be trained in. The richly coloured, lightly scented flowers are borne on old stems and the tips of new growth, so providing a long season of colour. Revolutum has the best colour and strongest fragrance. The Royal Horticultural Society has given it its prestigious Award of Garden Merit (AGM).