Climber

Clematis Cartmanii Early Sensation

Early on in the Spring Laura arrived with a beautiful Clematis with no label. We potted it on and popped it at the front of the house, which gets the early sun. It is now covered in beautiful white flowers and we have realised that it is Early Sensation. The Clematis variety Early Sensation is an evergreen clematis and can grow up to 9ft tall. It has finely divided leaves which emerge bronze when young and mature to a dark green. In spring this cultivar bears a profusion of scented, white, cup-shaped flowers each with a greenish-yellow centre. It belongs to the family Ranunculaceae. We are both excited and nervous. We love it but are afraid to lose it so lots of research needs to be done.

No routine pruning is necessary apparently. If the spread of the plant needs to be restricted prune immediately after flowering, cutting back overlong shoots to healthy buds. Apply a slow release balanced fertiliser and a mulch of well-rotted garden compost around the base of the plant in early spring. RHS

Clematis Cartmanii Early Sensation

Early Sensation and its cultivars originate from species native to New Zealand. It flowers prolifically and has attractive evergreen foliage which is non-clinging. This group of clematis is dioecious producing either male or female flowers. It is an early season clematis from pruning Group 1 so flowers early in the year on shoots produced in the previous summer.

This group of clematis is semi hardy and requires a warm sheltered position with a very free-draining soil in sun or partial shade. It is well suited to growing in pots using a well-drained gritty compost which can be brought into the protection of a cold glasshouse or conservatory in winter; it also makes a lovely subject for the alpine house. Plant your new clematis with the crown 2–3″ deep to encourage new shoots to grow from below ground level and keep it well watered during its first Spring and Summer. Clematis are greedy feeders and benefit from regular feeding.

Clematis Princess Kate – Zoprika

Following a negative Covid-19 test yesterday. Sean paid me a socially distanced visit and as always I was given presents. Firstly two beautiful cushions made by Deb. They match really well with the wallpaper in the bedroom. Secondly a big strong root of Clematis Princess Kate that I have been wanting for a couple of years. Very exciting. I plan on getting the other variety called Princess Diana which is equally beautiful.

This beautiful texensis type Clematis produces upright to nodding, bell-shaped flowers up to 6cm long that flare out widely towards their pointed tips. The petals have an attractive colouring, being white on the inside and stained reddish-purple on the outside. These petals form around rich plum-coloured stamens. The overall effect is very pretty and the plant has the benefit of a long flowering habit. RHS.

This variety was bred from the Clematis texensis, commonly called scarlet leather flower, a climbing vine in the buttercup family native to the United States, where it is endemic to the Edwards Plateau of Texas. Its natural habitat is on rocky limestone cliffs and beside streams.  Wikipedia

Clematis Group 3 Care Instructions :- In early spring cut back the previous year’s stems to a pair of strong buds about 6-8″ above ground level and apply a slow-release balanced fertiliser and a mulch of well-rotted garden compost around the plant avoiding the immediate crown. As a group three Clematis Princess Kate should be fast growing and vigorous.

2012 – The Breeder, Wim Snojer and grower J. van Zoest from Boskoop entered Clematis ‘Princess Kate’, in the annual competition and has won best new plant at Plantarium in Boskoop, the Netherlands. Judges from Koninklijke Vereniging voor Boskoopse Culturen said the plant flowers abundantly, bearing upright flowers with a unique shape, and has a well-chosen trade name, in line with other varieties of clematis. Zo – Pri – Ka