Chris's Weblog – City Chickens

Tag Archive: Groundcover

Cranesbill Cantabrigiense St. Ola

This cranesbill is an improved form of  Geranium cantabrigiense Biokovo which holds the white flowers for longer before ageing to pink.  It is an Alan Bremner hybrid, bred and named in Orkney.  A cross between G. dalmaticum ‘Album’ and G. macrorrhizum Album with aromatic, evergreen, glossy green leaves. It grows well in most soils, is low growing and forms good ground cover. 

I bought this plant as a bare root from wilko.com and it seems to be growing as it should. Unlike the tulips that I bought from there as pale pink and white that turned out a beautiful cerise colour. It was a slow starter but is now looking very good with a good amount of healthy bronze leaves. I am looking forward to flowers this year as it is supposed to bloom from May till first frost. It is listed as deciduous but perennial so hopefully will reappear next spring. All I have to do now is decide whether to keep it in the pot or put it into the border.

Cranesbill is very easy to manage.  Remove old overwintered leaves in spring, tidying up any damaged by winter weather.  Propagate by division in spring.  Pest and disease resistant. This will be the last of my cranesbill collection for a while. I have Beth Chato already in flower at present and more to look forward to.

Felicia Amelloides Marguerite – Blue Kingfisher Daisy

This year Laura has introduced a new little gem to our flower collection in the form of a South African,  groundcover Marguerite. As well as being a pretty blue flower, the foliage is attractive and seems sturdy. Apparently although Felicia has a somewhat fragile appearance, this durable, pest-resistant plant requires little maintenance. Once the plant is established and shows healthy new growth an occasional watering is sufficient. Water deeply to saturate the roots then let the soil dry before watering again. Deadhead regularly to prevent the plant from going to seed for as long as possible. Prune the plant lightly when it begins to look tired in midsummer. The fluffy seed heads appear as late as November and can be collected or left to self seed. The common name of this little beauty is the Blue Kingfisher Daisy. I like it.

 

Update 8th April 2018 – Today I have sown seeds collected last Autumn from this pretty Marguerite. I am hoping to produce a few plants to place around the pond this year.